Deadspin/Slate: NFL Teams Can’t Stop Scoring. When Will They Stop Running And Punting?

More on the increasing trend of offensive potency:

Additionally, these developments change the strategy equation in the end game. When offenses are in what they call the four-minute drill, trying to run out the clock with a single-score lead, they can no longer count on a run-only strategy. We used to talk about the two-minute drill, in which heroic quarterbacks lead their teams on a winning march down the field. Now, two minutes sounds like a quaint eternity. Offenses need only seconds to steal a win. In the Jaguars-Vikings game on Sunday, the teams needed only 1:18 to manufacture not one but two full, lead-changing drives totaling 10 plays and 11 points.

  • Spread The Love
  • Digg This Post
  • Tweet This Post
  • Stumble This Post
  • Submit This Post To Delicious
  • Submit This Post To Reddit
  • Submit This Post To Mixx

5 Responses to “Deadspin/Slate: NFL Teams Can’t Stop Scoring. When Will They Stop Running And Punting?”

  1. Anonymous says:

    could you link the original article?

  2. Jonathan says:

    http://deadspin.com/5942583/nfl-teams-cant-stop-scoring-when-will-they-stop-running-and-punting?post=52617564

  3. Joshua Perry says:

    Ty Jonathan

  4. John Bergan says:

    Hi Brian! I'm a big believer in Advanced NFL Stats theory (which is to say I'm a big believer in math), so I was surprised to see several teams struggle in week 1 despite focusing heavily on the passing game. Most notably the Panthers, but to a lesser extent the Eagles, Colts, Titans, Packers, and Lions all ran at least 60% pass plays* (65% if you ignore QB rushes) to limited success. In some cases (Packers, Colts), I imagine the opposing defense could have expected a high percentage of passes since there was a large deficit to overcome, but all in all I entered the work week having regained some respect for the running game. In particular, almost half of LeSean McCoy's rushing yards came in the fourth quarter and helped Philadelphia avoid an upset. What's your take? Was this just a fluky week? Am I focusing too much on a select handful of games? Or is there something more?

    *passing attempts / (passing attempts + rushing attempts)

  5. Chase Stuart says:

    "Offenses need only seconds to steal a win. In the Jaguars-Vikings game on Sunday, the teams needed only 1:18 to manufacture not one but two full, lead-changing drives totaling 10 plays and 11 points."

    Note that those were two of the worst projected passing offenses this year. And in Minnesota, it was a rookie kicker hitting a 55-yarder, showing just how easy kicking has become.

    I'll note that Scott Kacsmar believes we'll see offenses come back this year, and it will be interesting to track. He noted that a lot of the scoring in week 1 did not come from offenses: http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/49001693/ns/sports-nfl/

Leave a Reply